Lineup

Nothing brings people together like music. We’re excited to have St. Paul & The Broken Bones headlining HousingFest 2017.

St. Paul & The Broken Bones

St. Paul & The Broken Bones

Sea of Noise, the second full-length album by St. Paul and the Broken Bones, marks a quantum leap in sound and style for the high-voltage Birmingham, Alabama-based band. The group’s sophomore effort features an expanded eight-piece lineup of the widely praised soul-based rock unit.

Sea of Noise is a successor to the Broken Bones’ 2013 debut album Half the City, which introduced the group’s blazing mating of ‘60s soul fire – daubed with latter-day influences like Sly Stone, David Bowie, and Prince — to Paul Janeway’s impassioned singing and writing. The new album witnesses a deepening and broadening of the unit’s musical reach and lyrical concerns.

St. Paul and the Broken Bones, which toured extensively in the U.S. and Europe behind their debut album, now has their take-no-prisoners live show on the road. Their most recent concert work included arena dates opening for the Rolling Stones in Atlanta and Buffalo. Some acts may have been daunted by such a task, but not this one.

“It was pretty neat, it was pretty crazy,” Janeway says. “I love the Rolling Stones, but my train of thought it, you gotta try and blow ‘em off the stage. And that’s still my goal.”

Aaron Lee Tasjan

Aaron Lee Tasjan

After playing guitar with an eclectic list of bands, East-Nashville based musician Aaron Lee Tasjan delivered two of his own off-kilter folk-inflected albums to critical accolades. It’s his latest effort, his New West Records debut, Silver Tears, that best realizes his artistic ambitions and solidifies him as one of the most intriguing singer/songwriters to emerge in sometime. An inspired and confident set of songs, the 12-track album, which features a cover with Tasjan decked out in a reflective suit and Stetson, careens from woozy pot paeans to brooding, cinematic observations to laid back ‘70s country-rock and galloping anthems to introspective folk and rollicking honky tonk.